Joseph Stiglitz

Nobel Prize in Economics 2001

Joseph Stiglitz, BCC Conferenciantes
English

A graduate of Amherst College, Joseph Stiglitz received his PHD from MIT in 1967, became a full professor at Yale in 1970, and in 1979 was awarded the John Bates Clark Award, given biennially by the American Economic Association to the economist under 40 who has made the most significant contribution to the field.

Joseph Stiglitz has taught at Princeton, Stanford, MIT and was the Drummond Professor and a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is now University Professor at Columbia University in New York. In 2001, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics.

Joseph Stiglitz was a member of the Council of Economic Advisers from 1993-95, during the Clinton administration, and served as CEA chairman from 1995-97. He then became Chief Economist and Senior Vice-President of the World Bank from 1997-2000.

Joseph Stiglitz helped create a new branch of economics, “The Economics of Information,” exploring the consequences of information asymmetries and pioneering such pivotal concepts as adverse selection and moral hazard, which have now become standard tools not only of theorists, but of policy analysts.

Joseph Stiglitz has made major contributions to macro-economics and monetary theory, to development economics and trade theory, to public and corporate finance, to the theories of industrial organization and rural organization, and to the theories of welfare economics and of income and wealth distribution. In the 1980s, he helped revive interest in the economics of R&D. His work has helped explain the circumstances in which markets do not work well, and how selective government intervention can improve their performance.

Recognized around the world as a leading economic educator, Joseph Stiglitz has written textbooks that have been translated into more than a dozen languages. He founded one of the leading economics journals, The Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Joseph Stiglitz has recently come out with a new book, The Roaring Nineties (W.W. Norton). His book Globalization and Its Discontents (W.W. Norton June 2001) has been translated into 28 languages and is an international bestseller.

With humor he delivers the most informative of messages that convey the global economic context with ease.

Conferences

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The Great Divide- 2015

How has America become the most unequal advanced country in the world, and what can we do about it?

In The Great Divide, Joseph E. Stiglitz expands on the diagnosis he offered in his best-selling book The Price of Inequality and suggests ways to counter America’s growing problem. With his signature blend of clarity and passion, Stiglitz argues that inequality is a choice—the cumulative result of unjust policies and misguided priorities.

Gathering his writings for popular outlets including Vanity Fair and the New York Times, Stiglitz exposes in full America's inequality: its dimensions, its causes, and its consequences for the nation and for the world. From Reagan-era to the Great Recession and its long aftermath, Stiglitz delves into the irresponsible policies—deregulation, tax cuts, and tax breaks for the 1 percent—that are leaving many Americans farther and farther beyond and turning the American dream into an ever more unachievable myth. With formidable yet accessible economic insight, he urges us to embrace real solutions: increasing taxes on corporations and the wealthy; offering more help to the children of the poor; investing in education, science, and infrastructure; helping out homeowners instead of banks; and, most importantly, doing more to restore the economy to full employment. Stiglitz also draws lessons from Scandinavia, Singapore, and Japan, and he argues against the tide of unnecessary, destructive austerity that is sweeping across Europe.

Ultimately, Stiglitz believes our choice is not between growth and fairness; with the right policies, we can choose both. His complaint is not so much about capitalism as such, but how twenty-first-century capitalism has been perverted. His is a call to confront America's economic inequality as the political and moral issue that it is. If we reinvest in people and pursue the other policies that he describes, America can live up to the shared dream of a more prosperous, more equal society.

The Great Divide- 2015

Law and Economics with Chinese Characteristics- 2013

Institutions for Promoting Development in the Twenty-First Century

Explores how the lessons of the Chinese market economy might help policymakers in other countries to achieve equitable and sustained development
Provides a critique of the prevailing law and economics doctrines that have been influential in shaping legal doctrines and institutions around the world
Explains which institutional arrangements, including legal systems, are most likely to promote development

Law and Economics with Chinese Characteristics- 2013

Sovereign Wealth Funds and Long-Term Investing

Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWFs) are state-owned investment funds with combined asset holdings that are fast approaching four trillion dollars. Recently emerging as a major force in global financial markets, SWFs have other distinctive features besides their state-owned status: they are mainly located in developing countries and are intimately tied to energy and commodities exports, and they carry virtually no liabilities and have little redemption risk, which allows them to take a longer-term investment outlook than most other institutional investors.
Edited by a Nobel Laureate, a respected academic at the Columbia Business School, and a longtime international banker and asset manager, this volume examines the specificities of SWFs in greater detail and discusses the implications of their growing presence for the world economy. Based on essays delivered in 2011 at a major conference on SWFs held at Columbia University, this volume discusses the objectives and performance of SWFs, as well as their benchmarks and governance. What are the opportunities for SWFs as long-term investments? How do they fulfill their socially responsible mission? And what role can SWFs play in fostering sustainable development and greater global financial stability? These are some of the crucial questions addressed in this one-of-a-kind volume.

Sovereign Wealth Funds and Long-Term Investing

Debates on the Measurement of Global Poverty-2010

he international community's commitment to halve global poverty by 2015 has been enshrined in the first Millennium Development Goal. How global poverty is measured is a critical element in assessing progress towards this goal, and different researchers have presented widely-varying estimates.

Topics covered include the controversies surrounding the definition of a global poverty line; the use of purchasing power parity exchange rates to map the poverty line across countries; and the quality, and appropriate use, of data from national accounts and household surveys.

Both official and independent estimates of global poverty have proved to be controversial, and this volume presents and analyses the lively debate that has ensued. The chapters in this volume address a range of problems in the measurement and estimation of global poverty, from a variety of viewpoints.

Debates on the Measurement of Global Poverty-2010

Time for a Visible Hand- 2010

Time for a Visible Hand

Lessons from the 2008 World Financial Crisis

Highly topical volume on the current financial crisis
Contributions from leading scholars including Nobel Laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz
Provides the reader with a good understanding of the current crisis including underlying reasons and solutions.

Written so that both experts and non-experts will find it accessible and easy to read
Provides an alternative approach to the conventional wisdom that failed

Time for a Visible Hand- 2010