Dambisa Moyo

Economista internazionale, specializzata in macroeconimia e globalizzazione. Giovane leader globale per il World Economic Forum.

Autrice del bestseller "Dead Aid: Why Aid is Not Working and How there is a Better Way for Africa"

DAMBISA MOYO conferencia, keynospeaker, conferenciante
Inglés

Dambisa Moyo è un’economista internazionale, specializzata in macroeconomia e globalizzazione. È autrice del best seller (New York times) Dead Aid: Why Aid is Not Working and How there is a Better Way for Africa. Il suo prossimo libro si intitola: How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly and the Stark Choices Ahead.

Dambisa Moyo si batte per fermare gli aiuti economici ai paesi africani tranne nei casi di calamità o catastrofi puntuali (come per esempio terremoti o siccità), lasciando che il continente costruisca un’economia propria nel corso dei prossimi cinque anni.

Il principale argomento dell’economista per abolire l’attuale struttura di aiuti è che la maggior parte dei governanti africani continua a detenere il proprio posto perchè il denaro continua ad arrivare dall’Occidente.

Nel 2009,  la signora Moyo fu nominata per il Time Magazine come una delle “100 persone più influenti del mondo e nominata per il Foro Economico Mondiale di giovani leader globali”. Nel 2011  pubblicò How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly and the Stark Choices Ahead, e nel 2012 analizzó in Winner take all, la corsa della Cina per acaparrarsi le risorse naturali e come questo potrebbe influenzare il resto dell’economia mondiale.

Terminò il suo dottorato in economia nell’Università di Oxford e possiede inoltre un master dell’Università di Harvard e un MBA in finanza all’Università di Washington D.C.

Nelle sue conferenze, Moyo da soluzioni economiche e proposte in tema di politica pubblica di fronte a situazioni econimiche tanto allarmanti. Dambisa Moyo ha lavorato per la Banca Mondiale e Goldman Sachs e regolarmente scrive per il Financial Times, The Economist e Wall Street Journal.

Macroeconomia

Globalizzazione

Politiche Pubbliche

L’impatto della Cina nel panorama economico mondiale

Il mondo sviluppato sostiene gli ideali del capitalismo, della democrazia e i diritti politici per tutti. Nei mercati emergenti, a vote non possono permettersi quel lusso. In questa importante conferenza, la economista Dambisa Moyo difende l'idea che l'Occidente non possa dormire sugli allori e pensare che gli altri lo seguiranno ciecamente. Nel frattempo, un modello distinto, incarnato dalla Cina, conquista sempre di più nuovi adepti. Fa un invito alla cooperazione con apertura mentale politica ed economica in nome della trasformazione del mondo.

Economia Africana

La situazione della donna in Africa

Mercati ed economie emergenti

Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa

A national bestseller, Dead Aid unflinchingly confronts one of the greatest myths of our time: that billions of dollars in aid sent from wealthy countries to developing African nations has helped to reduce poverty and increase growth. In fact, poverty levels continue to escalate and growth rates have steadily declined―and millions continue to suffer. Debunking the current model of international aid promoted by both Hollywood celebrities and policy makers, Dambisa Moyo offers a bold new road map for financing development of the world's poorest countries.

Much debated in the United States and the United Kingdom on publication, Dead Aid is an unsettling yet optimistic work, a powerful challenge to the assumptions and arguments that support a profoundly misguided development policy in Africa. And it is a clarion call to a new, more hopeful vision of how to address the desperate poverty that plagues millions.

Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa

How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly--and the Stark Choices Ahead

In How the West Was Lost, the New York Times bestselling author Dambisa Moyo offers a bold account of the decline of the West's economic supremacy. She examines how the West's flawed financial decisions have resulted in an economic and geopolitical seesaw that is now poised to tip in favor of the emerging world, especially China.

Amid the hype of China's rise, however, the most important story of our generation is being pushed aside: America is not just in economic decline, but on course to become the biggest welfare state in the history of the West. The real danger is a thome, Moyo claims. While some countries – such as Germany and Sweden – have deliberately engineered and financed welfare states, the United States risks turning itself into a bloated welfare state not because of ideology or a larger vision of economic justice, but out of economic desperation and short-sighted policymaking. How the West Was Lost reveals not only the economic myopia of the West but also the radical solutions that it needs to adopt in order to assert itself as a global economic power once again.

How the West Was Lost: Fifty Years of Economic Folly--and the Stark Choices Ahead

Winner Take All: China's Race For Resources and What It Means For Us

Our planet's resources are running out. The media bombards us with constant warnings of impending shortages of fossil fuels, minerals, arable land, and water and the political Armageddon that will result as insatiable global demand far outstrips supply. But how true is this picture?

In Winner Take All, Dambisa Moyo cuts through the misconceptions and noise surrounding resource scarcity with a penetrating analysis of what really is at stake. Examining the operations of commodity markets and the geopolitical shifts they have triggered, she reveals the hard facts behind the insatiable global demand for economic growth. In this race for global resources, China is way out in front.

China, Moyo reveals, has embarked on one of the greatest commodity rushes in history. Tracing its breathtaking quest for resources - from Africa to Latin America, North America to Europe - she examines the impact it is having on us all, and its profound implications for our future. What, Moyo asks, will be the financial and human effects of all this - and is large-scale resource conflict inevitable or avoidable?

Instead of another polemic, Winner Take All is a clear-eyed look at the realities we all need to face if we want a just, balanced and peaceful global economy for the 21st century.

Winner Take All: China's Race For Resources and What It Means For Us